MEETING WITH…

MARIA BOSCH
The circle as form and its emptiness

The work of ceramist María Bosch is deeply rooted in nature, in the living cycles that occur in our environment and shape the universe – continuous cycles repeated seemingly endlessly, although each is actually unique and unrepeatable. It is their essence, their relationship and the way each cycle is a substitute for the one before, that gives meaning to the whole and that defines a cycle as endless.

“I realize that each time is different… CYCLES is part of a time of constant turmoil, where balance is needed to understand the fragility of the moment. The circle – its shape and its emptiness – are two aspects of the same reality. They coexist and cooperate, inseparable parts of a vital dynamic full of new challenges, opportunities and situations. Of a time when the pace has changed, with no patterns or fixed sequences, and results are different. Influenced by the environment, each cycle needs the others to be seen as part of a larger, all-encompassing cycle.”

Her hands work in the ancient tradition of pottery which speaks to her from distant times and places. Earth, nature, culture, connection, life cycles… They all serve to inspire a creative process that resonates with us: it’s familiar. There’s an unquestionable connection between her work and the whole story of wine that takes place in our cellars, on our white albariza soils bathed by sea air, and which has existed for two centuries of history and passion. Clay soil and the grape, two raw materials connected in an endless metaphor about life made of parts of cycles that arise and turn before our gaze, if we watch carefully.

Cicles
OF LIFE

FORM,
AND EMPTINESS

THAT COEXIST IN THE
SAME REALITY

 

These cycles include empty spaces, times of silence and waiting, two essential ingredients in the fermentation of an expression rooted in the depths of nature. Ceramics and wine-making share a fragile process and elements that are ephemeral: a flavour, a texture, water content, a touch of colour, a blast from a kiln, the long embrace of oak. An entire cycle begins and ends here, on the land where we walk and the soil in which we sow.